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Killing Right-to-Know: The bait and switch

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From the beginning of the RTK movement, CMA's aim was clear: "Avoid or soften state and local right-to-know laws." (view entire document) CMA's own polling showed that Americans overwhelmingly believe they have the right-to-know "nearly all aspects" of chemical manufacturing, use and operations in their communities. (view entire document)

The Association responded not by listening to community concerns, but by hiring slick PR firms to ward off the bite of grassroots campaigns for the right-to-know with a toothless approach: self-reported, self-serving, watered-down information controlled by the chemical industry. The industry's greatest fear seems to be that voters will decide for themselves what they have a right-to-know. The chemical industry wants to decide what you need to know.

After Prop. 65 passed, CMA repeatedly expressed public support for right-to-know. (view entire document)(view entire document) But behind closed doors, the industry cheered each time an RTK initiative or bill was defeated or weakened:

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last updated: march.27.2009

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